The Attributes of a Great Finance Director

Have you just been promoted to Finance Director?
Or perhaps this is your career ambition for the future?

If you’ve made it, then congratulations for completing your studies, and your training, and for landing your great new role. If you’re not there yet, then keep at it and you will make the grade in no time at all!

So, when you land that Finance Director appointment, what is likely to be on your mind

  • Do you need to impress and deliver – fast – but you’re not yet sure how the place ticks?
  • What about your team? Do you know the personalities and how they fit together? Or maybe you need a new team?
  • Are all eyes on you? Perhaps some of those eyes are waiting for you to trip up?

I know how you feel. I’ve been there.

I too have worked my way up through the ranks having originally passed my professional accountancy exams back in 1997. It was a lot of number crunching back then and the environment was much different to the rarefied atmosphere of an FD. As my career progressed I found that I was spending less time working with other finance professionals and more with people from different walks of life. However, there was always that security of working within a finance team. There was always The Boss to turn to for advice, guidance and support.

Then came my first day as a Finance Director: I didn’t realise that the step change would be so significant. Although the technical demands of the role were no more demanding than before the environment was totally different. None of my peer group had any finance experience, everyone was looking to me for leadership and there was no Boss to provide support.

I confess that it was tough. I enjoy being out of my comfort zone, as it is a great way to grow, but having a support network would have helped me to grow even faster.

I know and understand the challenges. This is where the fun and the pressure, and the rewards really start. I know that you want to do your very best.

Get it right and you’ll be rewarded well. Possibly with share options or a decent pension or more.

Get it wrong and you risk slower progression, stress and missed opportunities. Worse case scenario: You fail your probationary period and leave with a damaged CV.

So what are the options for success?

Of course, you could just wing it. But do you want to take your stress home with you each night? Agreed; the worse-case-scenario probably won’t happen – but do you want to take the risk?

Or you could discuss your issues internally with your colleagues. I know that worked for me in the past, but only before I was an F.D. Do you really want to discuss your finance issues with the head of marketing or share your personal concerns with the CEO?

OK, so there are other professionals out there. When I first googled ‘coach’ and ‘mentor’ I got thousands of results. And, to be frank, I found it quite off-putting. The market seemed to be dominated websites about rainbows and tree hugging. To be honest, it isn’t any wonder that professionals such as you are cynical. I was too.

I know that you want to quickly understand what makes a great FD – from another FD – and you want to put that understanding into practice. You want a source of confidential advice and guidance that will unlock your potential and give you the inside track to success.

Here is what you need to.

Go to the box at the top-right of this web-page. The link will take you to a page where you can get free report:

The Ten Key Attributes of an Outstanding Finance Director that you need to emulate if you want to be successful

Or, if you’re already committed to working with a professional Finance Director to give your career a boost, then get in touch and ask for meeting to explore your options – free of charge.

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About Adrian Fowles

Business advisor, finance mentor and cash coach - Turning your pipe dream into a revenue stream - http://acf-associates.com/
This entry was posted in Business, Coaching, Finance, SME and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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